Readings in Personality Psychology

by
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Pub. Date: 2006-07-27
Publisher(s): Pearson
List Price: $86.65

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Summary

Reading in the sciences is becoming an increasingly challenging affair. Readings in Personality Psychology offers welcome help. The book includes a diverse collection of source materials in personality psychology and provides support for students about how to read them. Readings In Personality Psychology is a book of readings for the undergraduate course in personality psychology. In addition to source readings, the book includes (new) original content that provides support, context, and instruction to students about how to read in the field. The book's first chapter describes a rationale for reading in the discipline and discusses some of the major issues and challenges in doing so. Each subsequent chapter describes a different sort of reading (e.g., original research report, theoretical review, book review, etc.) and the special challenges involved in reading and studying them. The primary Table of Contents organizes readings according to a systems approach: (a) introduction, (b) parts of personality, (c) personality organization, and (d) personality development. The alternate Table of Contents organizes the readings according to major theoretical perspectives of the field: (a) introductory issues; (b) biological bases, dispositions, and traits; (c) psychodynamics and social cognition; and (d) humanistic and developmental approaches. Readings include: Classics, such as a selection from Freud's Introductory Lectures Contemporary selections such as Arnett's Emerging Adulthood and McAdams' What Do We Know When We Know a Person? Student-relevant articles such as, Study Habits and Eysenck's Theory of Extraversion-Introversion, Provocative case studies such as Possible False Confession in a Military Court Martial Review articles such as Markus & Nurius' Possible Selves Original essays introducing each chapter such as Reading an Empirical Research Report

Table of Contents

A Systems Organization
Introductory Issues
Reading Personality Psychology: Frequently Asked Questions
1(6)
What Does It Mean to Read Personality Psychology?
1(2)
Why Read Primary and Secondary Source Material?
3(3)
Concluding Comments
6(1)
Teaching Personality Psychology: The Professors' Debate
7(12)
Reading a Professional Newsletter
7(3)
How Should We Teach Undergraduates about Personality (Brief comments by)
10(8)
M. Leary
J. D. Mayer
R. Hogan
R. Wheeler
R. Osborne
R. Baumeister
D. Tice
Concluding Comments
18(1)
Thinking Big about Personality Psychology
19(21)
Encountering the Big Picture
19(3)
What Do We Know When We Know a Person?
22(17)
D. P. McAdams
Concluding Comments
39(1)
The Proper Use of Psychological Tests: An Expert Speaks
40(12)
An Expert's Expert
40(3)
What Counselors Should Know about the Use and Interpretation of Psychological Tests
43(8)
A. Anastasi
Concluding Comments
51(1)
Parts of Personality
Exploring Parts of Personality with a Quasi-Experimental Design
52(6)
Reading an Empirical Research Report
52(3)
Sensation Seeking and Need for Achievement among Study-Abroad Students
55(2)
M. L. Schroth
W. A. McCormack
Concluding Comments
57(1)
Exploring Parts of Personality with a Field Study
58(9)
Reading about a Field Study
58(3)
Study Habits and Eysenck's Theory of Extraversion-Introversion
61(5)
J. B. Campbell
C. W. Hawley
Concluding Comments
66(1)
Reading Programmatic Research: Studies about the Self
67(25)
Reading Programmatic Research
67(3)
Possible Selves
70(21)
H. Markus
P. Nurius
Concluding Comments
91(1)
How Good Is the Measure of the Parts?
92(12)
Reading a Test Review
92(3)
Review of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition
95(8)
J. P. Braden
Concluding Comments
103(1)
Some Funny Stuff
104(8)
On Professional Humor
104(5)
The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventor (MMPI) Updated: 1988 Edition
109(1)
A. Rosen
A Brief Report on Clinical Aspects of Procrastination: Better Late Than Never
110(1)
K. Alberding
D. Antonuccio
B. H. Tearnan
Concluding Comments
111(1)
Personality Organization
Reading Freud on Psychodynamics
112(16)
Reading Freud and the Early Twentieth-Century Grand Theorists
112(3)
Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis (From Lectures II, III, and IV)
115(12)
S. Freud
Concluding Comments
127(1)
Personality Dynamics in a Clinical Case Study
128(8)
Reading a Case Study
128(3)
Possible False Confession in a Military Court-Martial: A Case Study
131(4)
S. A. Talmadge
Concluding Comments
135(1)
Dynamics of Self-Control
136(7)
Studying Personality Processes (Quasi) Experimentally
136(2)
Defensive Self-Deception and Social Adaptation among Optimists
138(4)
J. K. Norem
Concluding Comments
142(1)
Changing Personality
143(10)
Reading a Summary of Studies
143(2)
Writing about Emotional Experiences as a Therapeutic Process
145(7)
J. W. Pennebaker
Concluding Comments
152(1)
Personality Development
Studying Personality across Time
153(9)
Reading Longitudinal Research
153(2)
Transactional Links between Personality and Adaptation from Childhood through Adulthood
155(6)
R. L. Shiner
A. S. Masten
Concluding Comments
161(1)
Reviewing a Book on Personality Development
162(11)
Using Book Reviews
162(3)
Peering into the Nature-Nurture Debate
165(3)
W. M. Williams
Parents and Personality
168(4)
R. Plomin
Concluding Comments
172(1)
A Stage Theory of Development
173(18)
Help from a Grand Theorist
173(3)
Eight Ages of Man
176(14)
E. H. Erikson
Concluding Comments
190(1)
Re-Envisioning Development: Updating the Grand Theorists
191(20)
Reading Back to the Future
191(3)
Emerging Adulthood: A Theory of Development from the Late Teens through the Twenties
194(15)
J. J. Arnett
Concluding Comments
209(2)
Editor's References 211

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